Don’t use audiowarez

Note: this post was originally posted in 2012. For some reason, it seems to have picked up some SEO steam or something, leading to a lot of people who are okay with piracy feeling the need to comment that I’m wrong. Let me save you the time: this post isn’t really about piracy. If you read it, you’ll know why, and perhaps not feel the need to tell me how utterly wrong my opinion is.

Yeah, it’s soapbox time. After a nice discussion on DAW preference, I wanted to highlight some points I’ve tried to make in earlier posts on my blog, specifically those centered around using pirated software to make music.

In short: don’t.

The longer explaination as to why you shouldn’t use pirated audio software can be summarized like this:

  • It’s illegal. Ought to be obvious, but a shocking amount of people don’t know/care.
  • You start hoarding. You install “everything” you read about online, which leads to…
  • You won’t learn anything. This is the most important point!
  • Your system will turn unstable. Yes, it will. Bad cracks, malware (and loads of it) will turn your highly tuned audio-PC-monster into a sluggish 286 after a long night of partying. If you’re super-unlucky, you’ll also be hacked in some way or another. So much for “savings”.

Let me focus on the important point: you won’t learn anything by bathing in pirated plugins and softsynths. Why? Because you’ll just skip around, testing one plugin after another and never actually learning to know the plugin, what makes it tick, or even if it’s a good one to begin with.

Too much in the music production world is, unfortunately, about quick wins or “brands”. You see BT use this and that and think “OMG! That’s all I need to make music like BT!” — of course, this isn’t even close to being true, and everyone knows it, but self-delusion is a powerful force.

This is also the reason why today, in the days of Skrillex, that “Massive and FM8 = dubstep”. If I see one more “Make that signature Skrillex talking bass in Massive”-video on YouTube I’m going to vomit all over myself.

Therefore, instead of hoarding plugins and installing a gazillion softsynths, I recommend this alternative approach — it’s not littered with InstaMusic(tm) tips, but then again, that’s just the way it is:

  • Buy a legal copy of your favourite DAW and install it fresh. I like Reaper.
  • Check the bundled plugins, and IF you miss something — install just one of each “basic feature”-plugin. Yes, that means one compressor, one reverb, one delay, one EQ etc. This is to learn. You can expand later, but keep the count low.
  • Force yourself to use only those plugins. Learn all about them. Read the documentation!
  • Learn the built-in features of your DAW. They are better than you think.

The upside of this approach is that you’ll know your tools, which means that you’ll know what to do and when to do them! This means that you’ll be able to know exactly which plugins and methods to use later on, when you know all you need to know of the basics and want to upgrade.

End of rant. :)

35 thoughts on “Don’t use audiowarez”

  1. So I should pay steinberg 1500 euros just to have a daw, what about plugins, what about hardware? If I had to pay i’d never make anything because I can’t afford it, never in my life I had 1500 euros, and if I did I probably would invest it in food and shelter. They are selling thousands of copies of software to professional studios all around the globe, and catering to “music production is only for elite rich people” fuck that, I like their software but fuck those greedy assholes and their software protection

    1. I don’t think you necessarily read or understood my point in the post above if that’s your comment, and even though I’m probably going to regret this, I’ll attempt to “answer” your random comment rage anyway: your “argument” that you cannot afford to pay for software is a non-starter. Either you can or you cannot pay for the equipment needed in your hobby/work — it doesn’t matter if it’s software or hardware. Stealing software because you feel they are “greedy assholes” is stupid. Also, I don’t know how old you are or what your experience is, but your whole tone of entitlement pretty much makes me feel sorry for you. You make it sound like making music on a computer is a basic human right, right next to having access to clean drinking water or being free from political prosecution. What utter horse-shit.

      You mention Steinberg. Here’s an idea: if their DAW is too expensive for you, how about you use a free one? Or buy one that’s way less expensive, perhaps Reaper which costs just $60?

      Nah, you can go ahead on your crusade against paid software (clearly you need the money for food and shelter, and perhaps power to drive your computer or a mouse to use with it, or perhaps pay to upload your music to iTunes so you can earn a few bucks… oh right, the logic again — sorry), but you’re on your own — I don’t share your opionion even in the slightest, and if you’d actually read my post, this would have been clear as day already.

  2. Absolutely right, however I find that a 20 min demo for a synth or effect is usually enough to get a sound. Especially when you can just copy and paste the track to restart it. I have stuck with BFD for nearly 10 years now and that’s because it cost me an arm and a leg. The downside is that half of the expansions I paid a fortune for aren’t supported any more and I can’t use them. Cheers :-/

  3. I don’t agree with this at all. I pirated plug-ins until I learned them well enough to make good use of them, and then when I started earning good money from record deals I bought all those plug-ins. If downloading a plugin from Audiowarez causes a spark of creativity in someone, causing them to make something great, then let them have it. I’m not saying it’s the right choice, but I made money with those plugins and reinvested it back into them when I could afford to

    1. I’ve seen this argument a lot, and it basically boils down to: “I can’t afford XYZ so I stole it until I got good at it and then I possibly paid for some of it.” — in other words: you’re putting your own price on what you feel something is worth, after having taken advantage of it, and that’s not how markets work. It’s also now literally nothing else works: go into a pizza place, grab a slice and say “I’ll pay when I can, right now I just need this pizza.” is obviously not socially acceptable, neither is pumping your car full of gas, driving off shouting “I’ll come back to pay later if this is enough gas to get me to where I’m going!”. Or what about taking a dance class and insisting on only paying for the classes in 5 years time IF you get good at dancing? Of course not, that’s insane.

      I should also add that plenty of high-flying, financially well-off people (especially in the EDM world) have been caught using pirated software. They also give off this feeling that software has no financial value, which is scary in these times where almost everything is available in software form.

      So yes: you are of course entitled to your opinion, I just happen to greatly disagree with it. :)

  4. what this ,,educated,, rabbit is saying that if you are like him like his daddy is paying for all his toys-you should not get free software
    or maybe he has a gaboy daddy to pay for his stuff

    1. I’m a 38-year-old who’s had a steady job for the last 20 years and do music as a hobby, so yeah, I don’t have a problem defending paying for the things that I use, no. Also, kudos for offering absolutely nothing in terms of argumentation or value in your comment and for insisting on being anonymous online – that sure takes great courage and talent. :) But then again, that’s the kind of discourse I expect from someone who feels stealing is a perfectly acceptable activity.

      1. Look at you talking from your established and privileged position. Go you.

        Where I used to live, if you wanted to learn music, you’d be GIVEN an instrument FOR FREE so long as you used it to contribute to the local music community as well. And it worked well! The community was thriving! Local bands and orchestras traveled all over the country to share their music and the community it brought forth.

        Today so many people want to learn but can’t with the means they can afford. Someone who’s poor has the same right to learn and perform music should they want to, regardless of the money they can spend on it. If they don’t have money for something, it doesn’t mean they’re not worthy for it.

        Society doesn’t deem a lot of things of financial worth, but not having financial worth doesn’t make something worthless. Potential is something that doesn’t get opportunity to manifest anymore, people are expected to be accomplished already before they’re allowed in. Especially as a musician, you should KNOW this.

        Do not compete for worth. Collaborate, and grow, as a whole.

        Honestly though, you make a lot of good points. I agree that people shouldn’t consume software instruments like fast food. I agree you should learn and get to know your instrument. Absolutely. But I think keeping people with no funds from the means to learn and contribute and take part, requiring them to be well accomplished already or know the right people, in order to be able to partake…. No. I’m very sorry, but to me that simply will not do.

        1. Thanks for your comment — you’re touching on a few interesting things, and I choose to ignore the pointless snark in the opening of your post. :) There are a few things to unpack here, first of all: access to a teaching environment is, of course, essential to learn any skill, including music. It’s a shame that people can’t have instruments (be they software or hardware) if they are eager to learn.

          But as I mention in my original post: nobody has the right to steal software, just because they want to learn it. You want to learn how a synth works? Great, there are literally hundreds of free alternatives, go use those. Oh, you want to use that one particular one you read about online that all the pros are using? Well, then you buy it (or use a trial of course). Can’t afford it? Well, then you can’t afford it. It’s a shame, but I simply don’t subscribe to the entitlement idea that just because something exists as software means that it’s okay to just steal it. And yes — piracy is stealing.

          And yeah, a part of the problem with excessive piracy is that people just download everything and learn very little. Taking time to learn a craft starts with understanding the fundamentals and then moving up the ladder of knowledge as you go.

          As for the matter of musicians and financial worth, that’s a completely different story. Of course, artists are hardly paid what they’re worth — ever. Be it musicians, painters, digital graphics artist, game developers or what-have-you. Art is simply not (financially) appreciated by society as a whole, and it’s fucking sad. I’ve written about this on my blog earlier too. I make plenty of music, and I make peanuts. I have probably spent 10000x what I’ve made back in hardware, software etc.

          But that’s the thing: making music is still my hobby. Granted, a hobby I’ve had for 25 years now, but still: a hobby. It’s not my day job, simply because I cannot live by doing it. And, as for my “privileged position”.. do you think I could afford to buy whatever I wanted when I was 15 years old and in high school? Of course not. I had part-time jobs that paid for some of what I needed, and yes: I used freeware and pirated software back then. I didn’t know any better, and yes, the result was that I learned slower than I should have. I think I would have been a far more competent musician/technical artist if I had practiced what I learned at age 35 when I was 15. But then again, that’s the way the cookie of life crumbles, isn’t it? Don’t we all wish we could go back and impart wisdom on our younger selves? :)

          So to conclude: I simply disagree with the basic premise of your post — not condoning privacy isn’t the same as keeping things from people with no/low funds. There’s a metric shitton of great, awesome, superb free software out there. Use that, learn that, and grow with it. Some of the best musicians I know still use what they taught themselves on decades ago. Free software.

          That said, I completely agree with the sentiment that people shouldn’t compete for worth. Collaboration, learning form each other and growing as a community as well as individuals is what we all aspire to.. I hope. :)

          1. You realise there is a distinction between copying and stealing, right? Theft involves someone ceasing to possess what belongs to them, copying does not. If you’re going to make a case against copying at least call it what it is.

            Have you ever actually taken the time to study people who’ve succeeded in the production industry? And specifically the ones who’ve succeeded early. I have, and I can tell you that many if not most of them were helped along with a lot of expensive equipment, either by their parents or by people in the industry they knew.

            For a working class person to afford a decent computer, audio interface, midi keyboard, studio monitors and DAW is hard enough. Now you’re telling them to compete at a disadvantage because having too many plugins distracts you and copying is offensive? Give me a break, the barrier to entry in this industry is ridiculously high. Having a lot of plugins doesn’t stop you from frequently using a few and reserving the others for niche’/situational purposes. That’s kind of the point of having a wide variety: being able to choose your favourites.

            It’s all very well for you to sit back and tell people to put their ambitions on hold until they can afford the right equipment. Time is money, you want people to waste their time working for money to spend on something they can get for free, and might not even like or use very often.

            Only take this advice if you can already afford the software you’re pirating, apparently the author doesn’t understand the catch 22 of getting into this industry.

          2. If the paid product is software, copying it is the act of stealing it. Sorry, but word-games semantics have little room in a civilized debate about a serious subject.

            I can tell from the rest of your comment that you’ve chosen to just ignore what I actually say in my post (and the comments below — many of which are replies to comments similar to yours). I suggest you read through those because I don’t feel like repeating myself. However, since you’re unlikely to do that, and for the benefit of new readers: TL;DR: you’re not owed anything just because you can’t afford it, and there’s an amazing amount of free software that’s just as good as expensive software.

            Using “I can’t afford that one thing I want!” to mean the same as “My working-class financial status is keeping me from realizing my dream of making music” is idiotic.

            PS: it’s kinda pointless to try to put words in my mouth (like “you tell people to put their ambitions on hold until they can afford stuff”), when the entire post (and subsequent comment discussion) clearly has no such statement. In fact, as I just wasted my time repeating above: that’s not what I’m saying, and to anyone with eyes and 5 minutes to spare to actually ingest my actual argument, that’s pretty easy to see.

            You’re free to disagree, but please show up to a mature discussion with something less than a misplaced sense of entitlement that I’ve already explained away years (literally — years) earlier in the discussion. That just wastes everyone’s time and contributes absolutely nothing.

          3. “Sorry, but word-games semantics have little room in a civilized debate about a serious subject.”

            Coming to a consensus about definitions has a major place in civilized debate about a serious subject. The fact that you use this flippant rejoinder to try and avoid any discussion about the definition of intellectual theft is very telling. Suffice it to say that if this is your response to being called out on blatant equivocation you are the one who is playing games.

            I didn’t ignore your post, I engaged with it. I listed all the necessary expenses a budding working class producer is already burdened with and asked you to explain how they’re supposed to afford all of it and more without putting their life on hold. You ignored that point because it undermines your sanctimonious ‘principled’ which takes no stock of the realities people have to face to compete in the industry. You also ignored the point about people not being distracted by many plugins as you clearly were. You ignored the point about people who wouldn’t have succeeded if they hadn’t been bought the equipment you’re telling people not to copy. You do this as a hobby, don’t act like you understand how easy it is to be outcompeted in this business.

            To be honest I’ve seen this shtik on many forums in many discussions. “I’m not going to engage with any of your points because you ‘didn’t understand/read’ what I said”. It’s usually made by people who’ve had a rant and have no intention whatsoever of changing their minds. No, I understood perfectly well what you said, it’s a Utopian principled stance which can only be taken by people with no skin in the game.

          4. Coming to a consensus about definitions has a major place in a civilized debate about a serious subject. The fact that you use this flippant rejoinder to try and avoid any discussion about the definition of intellectual theft is very telling. Suffice it to say that if this is your response to being called out on blatant equivocation you are the one who is playing games.

            I’m glad you had time to dig up the Thesaurus, but I’m sorry to say that OMG WORDS bring nothing new to the debate. The “Aha, but if nothing PHYSICAL is taken then it CAN’T BE CONSIDERED THEFT” logical fallacy is thoroughly debunked a long time ago. I’ve already made my point, but let me repeat myself, for clarify:

            Just because you don’t go into a store and take a vinyl record off the shelf without paying for it doesn’t mean you’re not stealing if you take a piece of software or an MP3 of an album without paying. You’re just stealing different things from different people. And please, don’t come here with “Aha, but if I’m not allowed to steal something I can’t afford, so I can get good at it, I’ll never be able to pay for it in the future!” entitlement bullshit.

            I didn’t ignore your post, I engaged with it. I listed all the necessary expenses a budding working class producer is already burdened with and asked you to explain how they’re supposed to afford all of it and more without putting their life on hold.

            Sorry, but you just made it entirely clear you didn’t read any of my previous comments on this exact point.

            You ignored that point because it undermines your sanctimonious ‘principled’ which takes no stock of the realities people have to face to compete in the industry.

            No, I ignored it for the exact reason I gave: because I’ve addressed it multiple times in the comments section already. The fact that you (again) just blatantly ignore this and (for some reason) decide to make it about me and my “principled take” is beyond me.

            You do this as a hobby, don’t act like you understand how easy it is to be outcompeted in this business.

            I’ve done this as a professional (skills) hobby (not full-time) for 20+ years, yeah. It does offer me a certain level of insight on how the business and industry works, even if I don’t engage with it on a daily basis. Of course, that will inevitably be seen as “authority from above” logical fallacy, which it is — but no less than your “you’re not living off of this so shut up” is several other kinds of logical fallacies, so here we are. :)

            Are you seriously saying that people need to use certain pieces of software to avoid being outcompeted in this business? That’s a pretty far-out take on a business as varied as the music (and audio production/post-production) business. And clearly one I don’t subscribe to.

            To be honest I’ve seen this shtik on many forums in many discussions. “I’m not going to engage with any of your points because you ‘didn’t understand/read’ what I said”. It’s usually made by people who’ve had a rant and have no intention whatsoever of changing their minds.

            You’re free to repeat your same tired argument over and over, but all you do is continue to prove you haven’t read the full post and following comments discussion. But by all means, keep hammering this point for all the bystanders who look at this thread, shake their heads and go on with their day. Again: TL;DR: I see no reason to repeat myself as all of your points have already been addressed by my former comments.

            No, I understood perfectly well what you said, it’s a Utopian principled stance which can only be taken by people with no skin in the game.

            Clearly, you decided to just skim over all of my other points in order to try to hammer on your own point of view. Which is fine, but I’m tired of spending time repeating myself. I have zero sympathies for the entitlement position, sorry. *shrugs*

            Have you ever actually taken the time to study people who’ve succeeded in the production industry? And specifically, the ones who’ve succeeded early. I have, and I can tell you that many if not most of them were helped along with a lot of expensive equipment, either by their parents or by people in the industry they knew.

            Oh, yeah this. Yeah, I know a ton of successful people in the industry. Music, record, A/V — all of them. Sure, many of them have had it nice by either being able to borrow gear or studio time. Sure, many of them have gotten a golden start by pirating their asses off.

            And?

            Does that change any of my original points? That learning is harder if you have too many things available? Still valid. That people can learn using other software than the most expensive things? Still valid.

            You disagree — that’s fine. I just want you to realize that you have other reasons and motivations for disagreeing. From where I stand, they seem to be a mix of guilt, entitlement and loss of privilege. So by all means — find someone on the internet to disagree with, it just won’t be me any more, sorry. :)

            Again, for the bystanders, here’s a short version of my point:

            You don’t need any specific software to become good at music production. You don’t need to spend any money at all to use great software for free. Claiming that you’re being kept from your destiny or whatever due to some “unfair” premium software gap is horseshit, sorry.

          5. Ok look, there is a distinction between intellectual theft and actual theft. You only have to poll a bunch of people to see that while upwards of 50% of them would commit intellectual theft (and probably did at university a couple times), less than 2% of them would commit (or go on to commit) actual theft. That’s a MASSIVE distinction. Not a ‘logical fallacy’, not a conspiracy theory, a factual difference. Intellectual theft is NOT the same as theft, sorry. That’s precisely why the law does not punish the two offenses equally, and why people hold very different attitudes about them. It takes a hefty amount of mental gymnastics to pretend that there is no distinction between two offenses that are treated COMPLETELY DIFFERENTLY both in law and social attitudes.

            I understood your points, all of them. They’re utopian on the one hand and completely dismissive of the benefits of pirated vsts on the other. “You won’t learn anything”. Rubbish. “Your system will turn unstable”. Rubbish. None of that has happened to anyone I know. Some producers learn one synth really well, others get a bunch of presets together as their sound pallet. Plenty of successful producers out there who don’t know their synths well and use presets.

            I repeat, the barrier to entry is very high in this industry. I respect that you’ve done it for longer than me and I’m sure you know a lot of things I don’t, but this is just wishful thinking. Free synths aren’t just as good as expensive samples, there’s actually no comparison. In the one case you’re getting the expertise of professional sound designers and (often) the performance of real musicians, in the other you’re getting some plastic code.

            To summarise, it’s all wishful thinking. Intellectual theft is not the same as theft, having good sound design behind you is a large part of competing in the industry, having a wide variety of tools doesn’t need to distract you from learning some well, your computer will be fine. I understood everything you said, you are incorrect.

          6. Alright :) I will concede for anyone reading that if you’re good, you will get there eventually even with bad equipment, and that there’s plenty you need to learn as a beginner that doesn’t involve having good equipment. But my personal motivation (since you mention it) is actually that I’ve been a pretty good composer since I started producing. It’s about 8 years later and I’m still a pretty good composer. The main difference is I have a pallet of sounds to bring what’s in my head to life. I would have absolutely no sense of the possibilities within soundscapes if all I’d used were free synths, and absolutely no hope of bringing what’s in my head to life.

            What I’ve said applies especially for people trying to do film scoring. It’s just not possible to compete without a wide variety of decent samples. I wish it weren’t..

          7. Oh, this is an excellent point and I agree completely. You can’t get far in scoring without a decent amount of libraries, be it pure samples or Kontakt/soft-sampler libraries.

  5. SPOT ON. I actually think your final argument is so much more powerful than the “ethical” ones… But it’s so very true… When you have access to EVERYTHING, you will master NONE OF THEM.

    1. This is indeed my original argument yeah, thanks for sticking to it and not diving into entitlement land like a lot of the other comments. :) Overwhelming access to All The Things ™ leads to not knowing any of them. This is especially true for people starting out with electronic music production.

  6. Wooow, i’m seriously a culprit when it boils down to pirated soft ware… seriously when u have access to everything you learn nothing…. you touched on what I’ve been fighting in a long time.. thanks man

  7. Only reason I use warez is because I’m against DRM! I god hate that cancer called DRM.

    I never buy anything that comes bundled with that crapware and I can’t use software any way I like and activate it without any access to internet

    1. Sorry, but that’s a terrible explanation for stealing software. You have to realize that the software was never yours to begin with. You don’t have some sort of “human right” to access it.

      If you don’t approve of how the software is written and what it does (aka: comes with DRM), then you’re not authorized to use it. To rationalize taking something without paying for it is fine — go right ahead — but it doesn’t make it any less wrong.

      There are tons of free, open source, DRM free software out there that does the same thing as the software you decided to pirate. The fact that you choose to pirate something that costs money instead of using the free alternative says something about you, not the software.

      That said: I kinda hate dongles with a vengeance too :D

  8. Copying is not stealing, what you read is only what you read – but you are free to believe what you want to believe.

    I am a free software user and programmer because I believe that software is meant to be (re-)used, like music is meant to be heard.

    Music like software are compositions becoming sources of inspiration for future compositions, laws cannot change this.

    Human selfish and greedy nature and eagerness to exploit everything around at all costs, you can see it in children; and in the big picture by looking at the global social, societal or environmental issues it causes.

    The belief one will receive money all his life for a service he did pay with money or time and sweat is proved unrealistic.

    1. You’re free to be a free software developer and develop software you intend to be free. Others are free to develop software which they charge for. Your opinion that software should be free does not infringe on other’s right to charge for theirs. The fact that your “email” used to post this comment is “[email protected]” suggests that you’re fully aware it was a pointless reply. And it was indeed.

  9. can of worms :)

    Ive been a pirate since before the internet and we were running BBS’s
    and everything went through PFED to zip and id.diz the software.

    I have purchased lots of software and hardware in my time as well.

    The comment that if you use pirate software your computer will slow down is
    not the whole truth.

    yes some people who crack and supply cracked software have put nasty viruses in there code.

    This is a small portion of the cracks available.

    I remember a time when there was a cubase crack that was more stable than there dumb dongle
    version and many my self included purchase the crap package for the books and then used the crack.

    but all in all if one knows what they are doing and take there time installing and imaging there
    system a very stable system is possible.

    I would say that its even possible to have a more stable system through warez than without as
    some plugins and software are more or less stable than others even if there not cracked.

    So by having access to all of the software one can try and select the more stable packages.

    The cubase guy above is an idiot. Cracked cubase is not realy worth it in todays 64 bit age.

    The last full cubase that was cracked and realeased to the “public” was version 5.1 and was
    32 bit so all the new plugins that run under 64 bit wont run.

    Of course there are the crippled versions of cubase that are released cracked.
    But in my opinion they are floating around to advertise the full version of cubase which also in my opinion
    is no were near as good as it once was and is not worth buying when so many new DAWS offer the
    same or more features (and run faster and more “stable”).

    Purchasing because it helps support development and put food on the developers table I think
    is just and when I can I do purchase what I use.

    I have known many people to use a cracked version of a program and then purchase it because they
    liked the software my self included.

    the point that if you have a million and one plugins you wont learn how to use them …..

    well a compressor is a compressor eq’s come in a few flavours but are pritty much the same
    to operate, reverbs are all pritty much the same to operate and so on.

    They all sound different though :)

    synths and samplers can be quite differnt I will agree.

    It can take a long time to learn a synth and all of its ins and outs.
    but even then they are based on simular principals.

    If one is learning to engineer sound with no experience I can maby see your point
    but to say that you wont learn anything …….

    You seem to make a lot of statements with out any reference or proof.

    Reaper is great for newbees but I personaly cant stand the thing.
    its bland and doesnt work the way I want it to.

    I like sonar.

    I used to like cubase but because I have tried all of the platforms available I find my self
    going back to cakewalk which is a completely different beast from its first release in the 90’s.
    (which I also have)

    I could have stuck with cubase and still struggled with cpu overhead problems but instead
    I tried a few packages and found that I liked another more.

    there are so many technologies to learn like additive synths subtractive synths grain synths multiband compressors remotes for other plugins (like bluecats) Vienna Enssemble (which I think is a real game changer) and Convolution reverbs and equipment imaging that to be honest If I kept to what your saying
    I may learn how to use one or two programs and not know anything about the others.

    If I was paying for the programs while I was testing them my knowlage would not get past
    my pay check.

    The idea about massive being over advertised and people rushing to “Buy IT”

    Well warez is the solution.

    Better to use the u-He apps like zebra 2 for that kind of sound would be my opinion.

    I came to that opinion as I have tried many packages to find what works best for me.

    but unless you try the software
    (it often takes longer than the demo time to try out packages and a lot of software don’t even have a demo)
    you like most of the other people would think that massive is the best option there is.

    I have known people who used pirate sofware to teach others to use the sofware.
    This then helped the industry as there were more people purchasing the software.

    If you want a true review on a package dont go to the nearest google hit to see if the package
    is of any use.

    Go straight to an audio warez site or torrent site and read the reviews of people who can
    try out as much software as they like and actualy know how the package compares to others.
    You also know then that they are not getting payed by the developer to put up fake reviews.

    Piracy has been around long before Audio Warez.

    It is amazing that they have survived so long only selling to people who wish to buy the software
    or use it in a professional manor and need to buy the software to release there own work.

    But thankfully they now have your $60 to boost the industry and your wisdom
    of years of experience.

    Of course your welcome to your opinion

    I have left the spelling and grammatical errors so you can pick on them :)

    1. The comment that if you use pirate software your computer will slow down is not the whole truth.

      Keep in mind that this post was written many, many years ago. The quality of cracks was nothing to brag about, and yes: if you had an approach where you would horde pirated plugins, your system would at a certain point turn sluggish and crap. Trying to argue that “Yes, but only a few of the cracks were viruses!” is sort of invalid too. There were viruses in cracks, and the only way to stay safe was to stay clear of them. End of story :)

      I remember a time when there was a cubase crack that was more stable than there dumb dongle
      version and many my self included purchase the crap package for the books and then used the crack.

      I remember a few incidents of this happening too, over a decade ago, and also that almost everyone in the warez scene used this as an argument to legitimize their piracy efforts. This was a weak argument back then, and invalid in 2019.

      Purchasing because it helps support development and put food on the developers table I think is just and when I can I do purchase what I use.

      Purchasing software is the only way to support software developers. If you use something, you should pay for it. Fair and square. However, it’s when this argument is turned around and twisted into “Ah, but I don’t use all of this software that I pirated so it’s okay” that the logic falls together and you lose me. I’ve addressed this in several comments already so scroll up to read those.

      the point that if you have a million and one plugins you wont learn how to use them …..well a compressor is a compressor eq’s come in a few flavours but are pritty much the same
      to operate, reverbs are all pritty much the same to operate and so on.

      Exactly — so why would it be okay to pirate a bunch of them just to learn them? Pick one, learn that – learn the basics, and then you can apply it to other plugins of the same nature. That is my argument from the original post.

      You seem to make a lot of statements with out any reference or proof.

      The blog post you’re commenting on is indeed my opinion, correct — you know, much like…

      Reaper is great for newbees but I personaly cant stand the thing.
      its bland and doesnt work the way I want it to.

      I like sonar.

      ..this one. :)

      Of course your welcome to your opinion

      And you yours. I just don’t agree.

      I have left the spelling and grammatical errors so you can pick on them :)

      Nah, I’m too old to care about that, no worries. :)

  10. no not like this one :)

    “Reaper is great for newbees but I personaly cant stand the thing.
    its bland and doesnt work the way I want it to.

    I like sonar.”

    This was was stated as my belifes and not fact “I Personaly Cant Stand”

    Thankyou for replying so quickly

    I See your view and to an extent I agree but I dont think it sees the whole picture.

    Do you think that the developers (I mean the actual programmers not the owners of the companies)
    actualy buy every piece of software so that they can see if there own efforts are in the right direction
    or not.

    Ive known Fox and ILM employees that have had cracked versions at home of other packages just so
    they can get an idea if they wish to use it in the realworld.

    When they decide to buy the app to make a movie do you think that the publisher of the app is saying
    please dont use our stuff you pirated it in the past.

    Side effects woke up to this and offered a fully functional free version of there very expensive
    package houdini to try and brake the strangle hold that Maya has.

    A Teenager is just starting out in music :)

    He downloads a copy of an application and learns it thinking that he will be the next big thing.

    When he graduates and gets a job he saves and buys the application that has been a large part of his
    life and holds the saves to so much of his passion and joy.

    How often do think this happens ?

    Yes I also believe there are lots of greedy selfish people out there that want everything for free.

    But I have also seen that the warez scene also helps the Industries that they are pirateing.

    A thought that came to me from this blog post yesterday was that a great way to release an unkown
    piece of software and get it to be seen by the world is to charge a reasonable high price for it
    and then let one of the guys who coded it let it out the back door so that the warez scene could review
    it ;)

    When enough people are using it for free then the pro’s will have to take it up and they pay big dollars.
    If I was to release it freeware then it would not be fair to charge the big companies for there copies.

    I wonder why there are no more full versions of cubase cracked anymore ?

    I would think that a cause more in need of being discussed and put in the light of the public is
    how the publishing giants are scamming all of the artists and paying them less for there
    work while leading people away from cd sales.

    When I download a piece of software or a song I know that it has not been payed for and that
    In some way I should balance the equation.

    But when people use spotify itunes or any other streaming service they are ripping the artists off
    without even knowing it.
    So honest people like your self are hurting the industries that they wish to protect with out even knowing it.
    Plus its legal because some big company with too much power has made it so.

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/why-you-cant-listen-to-princes-music-after-his-death?ref=scroll

    When you read this article you will see that Prince says that he did not wish to release his music via
    spotify to stop piracy.

    But then he released his music for free in CD’s around the UK in a paper ?

    I wonder who he is calling the pirates :)

    Prince has always been ahead of the others when it came to publishing and what is right.

    Then of course we have this :)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallica_v._Napster,_Inc.

    Thankyou for the chance to put my views across on this topic.

    It is wrong to steal I believe this to be true.

    But then again I also think its wrong not to share :)

  11. Not being funny but most thieves are hacks and can’t write for shit, let alone make a living from music with cracked ware. It’s pointless to convince hacks to pay for something they have no idea about. Have fun! ; )

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